Patanjali in a Nutshell - Sutra 1:2

Sutra 1:2

                                   

Complete mastery over the modifications of the mind is called Yoga

Pandit  Rajmani  Tigunait  and  Edwin  Bryant

 

Yoga is the cessation of the movements of consciousness

Light on the Yoga Sutras of Patanjali – BKS Iyengar

 

Yoga happens in the resolution of consciousness

Threads of Yoga – Matthew Remski

 

In the second sutra Patanjali explains what yoga could be (this is open to debate).  To stop our thinking mind or any movements or fluctuations of consciousness.  I agree that it is enjoyable to have an experience free from thought or a clear calm mind but consider that as a permanent state.  If this is the goal of yoga would our lives benefit by being in a state of thoughtlessness? If we emancipate ourselves from thoughts and ascend to the state of "yoga" how will our family feel, how will we make a living and work? Would we still be part of society? 

 

I think it is very important to consider what yoga means to us.  Being aware of our thoughts is a great tool to bring more balance into our life.  As we practice stilling the mind often mental habits, influences, and life experiences come up and inhibit yoga.  This is when the real yoga begins as we shift our lifestyle and habits to support calmness, balance, stillness, and of course, yoga.  The practice irons out the wrinkles of habit, influences, and mental turbulence or at least makes us aware of these factors that draw are attention away from deeper states of focus, mindfulness, or connection. 

 

My thoughts on permanence are influenced by nature.  There is life and death and nothing escapes this cycle.  In the natural world there is no permanence as things come and go. We cannot be in a constant state of inhalation as the exhalation must come to rid the lungs of carbon dioxide.  So to I feel that reaching a permanent state of yoga is impossible.  In the pages to come, Patanjali lays out practices and revelations on how to calm the mind and body and reach states of yoga but then we come down, back to our life, our world.  The practice is there for us to find yoga but not to hold it.  In ancient times sages and ascetics (or yogi's) would renounce life duties to pursue states of yoga (if any succeeded?).  Even in todays world I can't find proof that any practitioners have reached permanent states of enlightenment or yogic consciousness through yoga practice.  So what if experiencing glimpses of the states of yoga help us to wake up to the situations in our lives.  Can stilling the fluctuations of the mind bring clarity and intimacy with our world? Is it possible to have an open understanding of what yoga is?

Patanjali in a Nutshell - Sutra 1:1

Sutra 1:1

 

Then comes the right to undertake the practice of yoga

Pandit  Rajmani  Tigunait  and  Edwin  Bryant

 

With prayers for divine blessings, now begins an exposition into the sacred art of yoga

Light on the Yoga Sutras of Patanjali – BKS Iyengar

 

We all inquire into yoga

Threads of Yoga – Matthew Remski

 

I feel that every human on the planet at some point in there life questions what consciousness is and try to understand how to calm the mind to catch a glimpse of what is happening on a deeper level.  We all crave a connection to the inner quietude.

 

In the first sutra Patanjali immediately opens the practice to anyone who wishes to experience their consciousness.  Regardless of caste, religion, or upbringing we are intrigued to delve into the practice of yoga.  This first line instantly sparks curiosity into the reader.  What is Yoga? Why should I practice? Is it my right to inquire further into my state of mind?

 

I feel comforted by the potential of the pages to come that will bring an inquiry or investigation into the deeper parts of myself, my community, and my life.  Yoga has many meaning and those meanings will change as I go through life but committing to this inquiry of yoga I will always have new findings to share. 

 

Check back soon as I will reflect on the Sutras of Patanjali.

 

The Yoga Sutras of Patanjali……in a nutshell.

The yoga sutras of Patanjali are a rich and contemplative arrangement of 196 sutras (aphorism) that challenge the reader to consider his/her own consciousness and understanding of what makes up reality.

 

I’m no expert on the Yoga Sutras but am drawn with intrigue towards the teachings as they are open to interpretation.  I’ve decided to share my reflections on the sutras in a very accessible and open presentation.  I hope everyone becomes curious to discuss and comment on what these sutra bring up in their understanding and experience.

 

Was Patanjali a magical sage? A group of philosophers? Half snake have man (really!)? Nobody really knows but the sutras are possibly as old as 400 CE (wiki). I’ve read that philosophers and authors in those times were rewarded and celebrated for removing even one syllable.  So the sutras are dense with meaning.  Sutras were traditionally chanted. A lot!  In order for the student to memorize each one and meditate upon their meaning.  As I have just began to delve into the yoga sutras of Patanjali I’m sure my understanding will change over time as I consider the teachings. I hope you will join my journey!

 

Patanjali’s yoga sutras make up the foundation of modern yoga practice and include the 8 limbs of ashtanga yoga which include; ethics (relations to others or yama), relations to oneself, posture (asana), freedom of breath (pranayama), freedom of the senses, focus, contemplation, and integration (the last 3 make up meditative practices).  The sutras also touch on the patterned tensions of conscious and unconscious life with a goal of possibly unbinding oneself from these happenings.  As there are many translations there comes many understandings of what Patanjali was recommending.  There is no central authority on what the sutras really mean as they are basically void of an author.  I believe the meaning of each sutra is relative to the reader and the culture that she/he is part of.  How can we let ancient teachings benefit our modern lives?

 

This will be a long journey dissecting each sutra (potentially skipping a few).  The beauty of philosophy is the teachings are open to contemplate.  The practices there to experience.  It is up to us to give them meaning.

Why Do Pilates? Our Teacher Katarina Explains

Katarina teaches fantastic Pilates classes - great for all ages, levels and abilites - these are fun classes that help build strength and balance. Register by phone (778-545-9918) or email (practice@liveyoga.ca) for the upcoming January 2013 session. More info available here!

1. Pilates is Whole-Body Fitness

Unlike some forms of exercise, Pilates does not over-develop some parts of the body and neglect others. While Pilates training focuses on core strength, it trains the body as an integrated whole. Pilates workouts promote strength and balanced muscle development as well as flexibility and increased range of motion for the joints.

Attention to core support and full-body fitness -- including the breath and the mind -- provide a level of integrative fitness that is hard to find elsewhere. It is also the reason that Pilates is so popular in rehab scenarios, as well as with athletes who find that Pilates is a great foundation for any kind of movement they do.

2. Adaptable to Many Fitness Levels and Needs

Whether you are a senior just starting to exercise, an elite athlete or somewhere in between, the foundations of Pilates movement apply to you. Building from core strength, focusing on proper alignment, and a body/mind integrative approach make Pilates accessible to all. With thousands of possible exercises and modifications, Pilates workouts can be tailored to individual needs.

 

5. Develops Core Strength

The core muscles of the body are the deep muscles of the back, abdomen, and pelvic floor. These are the muscles we rely on to support a strong, supple back, good posture, and efficient movement patterns. When the core is strong, the frame of the body is supported. This means the neck and shoulders can relax, and the rest of the muscles and joints are freed to do their jobs. A nice side benefit is that the core training promotes the flat abs that we all covet.

6. Improves Posture

Good posture is a reflection good alignment supported by a strong core. It is a position from which one can move freely. Starting with Pilates movement fundamentals and moving through mat exercises, Pilates trains the body to express itself with strength and harmony. You can see this in the beautiful posture of those who practice Pilates.

 

 

7. Increases Energy

It might seem like a paradox, but the more you exercise, the more energy you have and the more you feel like doing (to a point, of course). Pilates gets the breath and circulation moving, stimulates the spine and muscles, and floods the body with the good feelings one gets from exercising the whole body.

 

8. Increases Awareness - Body/Mind Connection

Joseph Pilates was adamant that Pilates, or contrology as he called it, was about "the complete coordination of body, mind, and spirit." This is one of the secrets of Pilates exercise: we practice each movement with total attention. When we exercise in this way, the body and mind unite to bring forth the most benefit possible from each exercise. The Pilates principles -- centering, concentration, control, precision, breath, and flow -- are key concepts that we use to integrate body and mind.